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Using Social Media to Screen Candidates (Part I)

If you take a look around our blog, it would be safe to assume that we are pretty big fans of using social media when it comes to recruiting, and just about everything else around the office.

However, one point that we would like to stress is that social media isn’t the end all be all of recruiting; in fact, in some cases using it can be to our disadvantage.

One area where this seems to ring true is in regards to screening candidates, which we outlined in our post on a study done by NC State University researchers. The study showed how misleading screening applicants can be when using social media platforms.

In case you missed it, here is a quick recap of their findings:

  • “People who posted references to drugs and alcohol were no less conscientious or no more conscientious than those who didn’t,” said Dr. Lisa Thompson, co-author of the study and professor of psychology at the university.
  • Will Stoughton, lead author and Ph.D student at the university, concluded that “companies are eliminating some conscientious job applicants based on erroneous assumptions regarding what social media behavior tells us about the applicants.”

Yes, using social media to screen candidates can be potentially misleading, but should we avoid using it at all? We don’t think so, which is why we thought we’d go through and give you a few tips on how to successfully use social media to screen candidates. Take a look below for our first tip:

Avoid the bad. Sure, it is important to look out for any big red flags that may indicate a candidate is wrong for the job, but as the research shows, it doesn’t always give us the results we want. If anything, going in with preconceived notions that the candidate has something wrong with them will just make it harder for you to make a fair call on hiring or not hiring the candidate. This is not only unfair to them, but a waste of company time and resources. So before you go ahead and start looking for photos of them partying or referencing something inappropriate, you might want to think twice.

On Thursday, we’ll finish up our post with a few more tips on how to successfully screen candidates. In the meantime, let us know your thoughts by connecting with us on Facebook or Twitter. We’d love to hear from you!

AIM is a not-for-profit community organization that promotes technology to empower people, enhance organizations, and create brilliant communities.

 

AIM is a not-for-profit community organization that promotes technology to empower people, enhance organizations, and create brilliant communities.

AIM is a not-for-profit community organization that promotes technology to empower people, enhance organizations, and create brilliant communities.

 

AIM is a not-for-profit community organization that promotes technology to empower people, enhance organizations, and create brilliant communities.

 
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